MDC ‘disown’ protestors

Chamisa's led MDC leadership deserted today's scheduled demonstration following High Court's ruling barring the opposition's urgent application appealing to proceed with the demonstration. 

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By Marshall Bwanya

Chamisa’s led MDC leadership deserted today’s scheduled demonstration following High Court’s ruling barring the opposition’s urgent application appealing to proceed with the demonstration.

Protestors were left alone to face the wrath of the police using excessive force to disperse the crowds in Harare’s CBD.

One protestor who preferred anonymity fearing victimisation expressed disappointment in the MDC’s leadership as he felt the MDC abandoned the people at a time they needed leadership the most.

“I am greatly disappointed and agitated by our leadership unwarranted actions to abandon us when they should be marching with us to address our economic grievances.

“Chamisa has shown he exercises elitist leadership from the comfort of his home.

The struggle is real, Chamisa’s should be have been on the fore-front leading us like the late Morgan Tsvangirai did in 2007 in highfields,” he said.

MDC spokesperson Daniel Molekele argued that the opposition party did not abandon protestors but were forced to postpone the demonstration, due to unlawful technicalities enforced by the police breaching section 59 of the Constitution that guarantees the right to demonstrate.

“The public is aware there was no march today, all our leaders were mobilised, traveled across the country for the march, but police stopped us from marching.

“Leaders could not go to the streets and freely march because of the police conduct, but that does not mean this is the end of the process we are still going ahead and we will review our strategy and lead people from the front,” he said.

Molekele reiterated that if the High Court and police persisted in barring demonstrations espoused by the constitution the opposition would embark on a new course of strategy that would allow people to exercise their constitutional rights.