Madhuku tears into new marriage bill

University of Zimbabwe lecturer and law pundit Professor Lovemore Madhuku has castigated the recently gazette marriage act as conflicted verge and half-baked piece of legislation.

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University of Zimbabwe lecturer and law pundit Professor Lovemore Madhuku has castigated the recently gazette marriage act as conflicted verge and half-baked piece of legislation.
University of Zimbabwe lecturer and law pundit Professor Lovemore Madhuku has castigated the recently gazette marriage act as conflicted verge and half-baked piece of legislation.

By Marshall Bwanya.

University of Zimbabwe lecturer and law pundit Professor Lovemore Madhuku has castigated the recently gazette marriage act as conflicted verge and half-baked piece of legislation.

Speaking at the HICC hosted by the Zimbabwean Women’s Parliamentary Caucus, Professor Madhuku said the bill presented new half-baked statutes that produced problematic errors that needed rectification.

“New things in the bill are child marriages, chief as marriage officers, new position of unregistered customary of marriage and outlawing of criminalization of deliberate transmission of HIV.

“Chiefs are now marriage officers but are being set to commit offenses because law is creating offenses for marriage officers, because mostly Chiefs are not chosen based on any other qualification,” he said.

Madhuku reiterated that some Chiefs were of advanced age and could be easily cheated on issues of age forgery, as its difficult for Chiefs to confirm whether one is a minor or not.

The law expert further noted the new marriage bill was sidelining and marginalising other religious communities such as Muslims and Hindus.

“The marriage bill is silent on religious marriages, for example in South Africa they have a separate law for marriages,” he said.

Professor Madhuku also castigated the new bill for failing to define when marriage has taken place in an unregistered customary law, whether is it when lobola has been paid or when there has been a ceremony.

This lack of clarification makes it difficult to curb or prohibit child marriage outside formal marriages.

“Minors are allowed to consent to sex at sixteen but not allowed to marry, that issue of consent is not in the bill but came there, but there is no one with the stamina to change age of consent,” he said.